How to Educate Your Patients through Blogs

03.21.2018

In the age of unlimited access at the tap of a button, people click ‘search’ before heading to a doctor to look into their symptoms or health query. Pew Research found that 72% of internet users looked online for health information of one kind or another and many found faulty information on leading self-diagnosing sites.

This alone is an exemplary reason why healthcare professionals need to put credible information online. Although it is highly encouraged to examine a patient in person, having resources like an educational blog or online forum is the best way for your practice to be thought-leaders and provide accurate information to those actively seeking to learn more online. Half of online health searches were also found to be on behalf of other people, so giving a variety of information for all age groups and health services related to your practice is essential to accomplishing this goal.

A good place to start is to reference your Frequently Asked Questions. Whether they are available on your website or in memory from constant inquiries in office, it is a solid foundation to the understanding of the kind of concerns your patients have. Elaborating on these topics even in as little as 300 words can be incredibly useful for patients and potential patients alike.

Another great way to get content for your educational blog is to stay up to date on the topics of the day. Trending conversations or national quirky holidays are a wonderful source of information to inspire your latest thought piece. Look into the month coming and you’ll be better able to plan out the timing of blogs, but be sure to be prepared to take the time to address a timely concern should the trend arise.

Establishing yourself as a thought leader not only benefits the practice, but also the people in need of your services. They’re out there searching because of a problem, let your thoughtful insight and expertise be the answer they were looking for.

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